Care & Support

You can find connections and lean on others who have experienced the diagnosis of a brain tumour. This includes a number of different way to connect to the brain tumour community such as:


Stories of Strength

These are just some of the stories of strength of the thousands of Canadians affected by a brain tumour. Find more stories in this section. And if you want to share your story, you can get started on this page.

Piper GillesPiper's Story: a dream more precious than Olympic gold

Hi, I am Piper Gilles. You may know me as a world-famous ice dancer. I competed in the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games. I am a 7 time world team member and a 7 time Canadian medalist. But the title that means the most to me is far more personal. It’s that of daughter to my amazing mother Bonnie Gilles, who I lost to glioblastoma on May 27, 2018.
 
DougDoug's Adventure 

I am Doug, I have brain cancer; I am told it is terminal, but the “good” kind of terminal. I can assure you that receiving that news was not as good as I think the people telling me thought it would be. But I choose never to define myself with negatives or problems so I will begin again; Hi, my name is Doug, a current defending two-time world rowing champion. That sounds better. Here is just a small summary of my adventure last year.

SaraSara: Team Fight like a Girl

Sara’s brain tumour diagnosis came during Thanksgiving weekend 2014 when doctors discovered a golf-ball-sized tumour on her right frontal lobe. Sara was immediately sent for an emergency re-section in Saint John, NB, which left her paralyzed. She spent over a year in intensive physical rehabilitation at the Dr. Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital and Stan Cassidy Centre to re-learn basic motor skills.
 

Bringing hope. Hope through research. Hope through patient support. Hope for a cure.

Paying it Forward: Has Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada made a difference in your life or the life of someone you care about? Your continued support is needed to ensure we are there to help all Canadians affected by a brain tumour.


Thank you to the following organization for your financial support 

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Featured Story

Make every brain tumour count

Stephanie, a 38-year-old mother of twins has been diagnosed with an extremely rare and inoperable brain tumour - a rosette-forming glioneuronal tumour, a type of tumour that little is known about and cannot be removed due to its location in her brain. This reality does not stop Stephanie from her tireless efforts to reduce the stigma of having a brain tumour. Learn why Stephanie is urging all Canadians to make every brain tumour count.

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Spotlight

Piper's Story: a dream more precious than Olympic gold

Hi, I am Piper Gilles. You may know me as a world-famous ice dancer. I competed in the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games. I am a 7...

Learn more

Doug's Adventure

I am Doug, I have brain cancer; I am told it is terminal, but the “good” kind of terminal. I can assure you that receiving that news...

Learn more

Upcoming Events

  • 26/Aug/2019: Greater Sudbury Support Group: Meets at The Parkside Centre, 140 Durham Street, Sudbury, Ontario... Learn more >
  • 27/Aug/2019: Webinar: Pituitary Tumours – Treatment & Management : Free webinar. Please register to join.... Learn more >
  • 28/Aug/2019: Toronto Support Group: Meets at Wellspring Westerkirk House at Sunnybrook, Toronto, ON... Learn more >
  • 01/Sep/2019: C Cup Classic 2019: Rocky Mountain Turf Club, Lethbridge, AB and Century Downs Racetrack &... Learn more >
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