Advocacy

What is Advocacy?

Advocacy is providing support or arguments in support of a cause. Advocates can support or act on behalf of another individual or group, or empower the individual or group to become self-advocates. Advocates help people to help themselves. Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada's advocacy program works to both make change for all brain tumour patients at a policy level while empowering individuals to effect change for themselves.

What we're doing: Important brain tumour issues

Every Canadian affected by a brain tumour has the right to have the information and support needed to fully participate in all aspects of life. Working to change practices and policies that are not inclusive of this community is critical. Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada advocates on behalf of the brain tumour community by:

  • Investigating and advocating on important issues to the brain tumour community.
     
  • Contributing to Canadians’ understanding about these issues and how they can work affect change 
     
  • Working with partners in Canada, North America and Internationally on efforts important to brain tumour patients
In December 2018, Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada was pleased to submit this response to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) relating to refreshing the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control.  

Make your voice heard!

Individual Advocacy

Is there an issue affecting you or your family or friends that needs to change? We offer you the tools to be your best advocate for personal situations and issues. This means working to educate yourself about issues at an individual level, so that you can best assist yourself or another person. This effect can help obtain needed services and to maximize quality-of-life. For more information see Advocating for Yourself. In that section you'll find tips for self-advocacy on any brain tumour related issue.

 

Volunteers are an important part of all of this work, read about some of the volunteers who are dedicated to brain tumour advocacy efforts:

Brandon's Story: "Keep fighting I will..." - Brandon's Story was written by his mother Jennifer. Jennifer is a long-time passionate and active advocate for the brain tumour community. She is sharing Brandon's story in support of Brain Tumour Awareness Month in the hopes that it will both honour his legacy and let other families know they are not alone.
 Trevor's Story: “More Awareness Would Be a Great Leap Forward” - When he headed out for a touch football game in mid-September 2010, being diagnosed with a serious illness was the furthest thing from 24-year-old Trevor Harrison’s mind. After experiencing a seizure on the field, he was rushed to the emergency room of the general campus of Ottawa Hospital. Before long he was being told he needed surgery to remove a mass on his brain.

This unexpected diagnosis led to an immediate leave from his demanding Ottawa job as a political staffer on Parliament Hill. Surgery was scheduled for the end of September. It was during that time that Trevor learned that October is Brain Tumour Awareness Month in Canada. Read more...

Femma's Story: Caregiver and Survivor Takes Advocacy to the National Level - The cliché is; “when life gives you lemons, you make lemonade,” and activist Femma Norton brings this saying to life by taking the many lemons she has been given and squeezing the most out of them. Her sheer optimism and determination have led to important efforts for the brain tumour community in Canada. Read more...
Marianne's Story: Making Change for Patients and Families - “It’s all about the patients,” explains neurosurgery social worker and Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada volunteer Marianne Lee. In 2006 Marianne was approached by neurosurgeon and chair of the board Dr. Joseph Megyesi about joining the organization’s Board of Directors.

“I decided it was a great way to make a difference at a larger level, to help brain tumour patients across the country.” Since that time Marianne has given of her time and expertise in many ways, helping to lead change and growth for the brain tumour community. Read more...

 

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Upcoming Events

  • 16/Feb/2019: Rebounders - LdnOnt: Meeting 205 Horton St, London, ON... Learn more >
  • 18/Feb/2019: Guelph Support Group: Meets at Hospice Wellington, Community Program Room, 795 Scottsdale Avenue,... Learn more >
  • 19/Feb/2019: North Bay Support Group: Meets at St. Luke's Catholic Elementary School, 225 Milani Road, North Bay.... Learn more >
  • 19/Feb/2019: Groupe de soutien virtuel: Un groupe de soutien virtuel pour personnes touchées par une tumeur... Learn more >
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