Olympic Athlete Supports Brain Tumour Research in Honour of Father

As an elite athlete, Cheryl Bernard faces challenges head-on with determination and force. Her father’s courageous journey with a Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) was no different and following his diagnosis, she quickly found herself focusing a great deal of her energy on treatment, appointments and care. “It changed my life,” she explains. “I pretty much moved in with my parents to help them manage it all.” Today the Olympic medal-winning curler from Calgary, Alberta is honouring her father’s memory by volunteering as a spokesperson for Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada and the national fundraising program, Spring Sprint  (now Brain Tumour Walk).

“My Dad and I were incredibly close. I was angry at the diagnosis and did everything and anything to find a cure,” Cheryl remembers. Knowing first-hand the importance of patient support, education and information, Cheryl has volunteered her time to help raise funds and awareness for Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada. Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada is the only national organization providing support, education and information to the 55,000 Canadians affected by a brain tumour. The organization also funds critical research into the causes of and a cure for brain tumours. Cheryl’s goal is a world without brain tumours, “I hope the funds raised through the 21 Spring Sprint events help to create technological and surgical advances and ultimately find a cure for brain tumours.” 

Susan Marshall, Executive Director of Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada is excited about the awareness that Cheryl will bring to the Spring Sprint program and the importance of brain tumour research. “The prospect for all of the research that will be conducted as a result of the funds raised is very exciting,” Susan explains. “Our vision is to find a cure for brain tumours and to improve the quality of life for those affected. We move closer to this reality with the efforts of Spring Sprint and the support of people like Cheryl.”

Read the Media Release about Cheryl's support for brain tumour research, support, education and information here.

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Story posted: April 2011


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